Creating a PowerPoint “Movie”

I’m currently taking a class for my bachelor’s degree called Preparing for the Future (IDS 403). When I first signed up for it, I thought it was going to be something along the lines of personal goal setting and career path planning, but the moment I read the syllabus, I knew I had guessed way wrong.

This class has turned out to be all about technology and its influence on society, and vise versa. It is demonstrating the evolution of society and technology as two correlating factors throughout history while attempting to arm students with methods of addressing a societal problem and finding a solution through technology.IDS 403-T5272 – Wastewater Reuse Mod 6

It has been a demanding course with an extensive project broken into many “milestones”, but I am thoroughly enjoying it. Let me just say, though, I am so glad I am at the very least familiar with PowerPoint. Actually, I am a certified Microsoft Office Specialist in PowerPoint, but if I had never used PowerPoint or had very little knowledge before this class, I’m telling you right now, I wouldn’t be enjoying this course at all!

I have basically had to create a “movie” with PowerPoint using slides and voice narration. I am essentially giving a static presentation that I, luckily, don’t have to stand in front of anyone to give. I have also had to record a few video blogs which my husband would laugh and make faces at me while I was creating them, and I would in turn flick him off off-screen, but I digress.

After all this piecing together clips and voice narrating and formatting and optimizing, I have never had such respect for movie editors before in my life! Maybe this is a hidden piece to the Preparing for the Future curriculum; preparing us for lives as film editors!

Ehh. After watching and listening to my little movie, I think I will stick with my current day job..

How to: Edit Your Work

This topic is one that has hit home recently. With my second novel released, I felt like I should offer the bit of wisdom that I am gaining with each new book I finish. Depending on what software you prefer to word process your work, there are quite a few tools at your disposal to best benefit you in the editing area.

Before the final publishing for my newest novel, “The Shoreline” , I seriously contemplated sending it off to be professionally edited. I did some research, and most editing services were a bit out of my price range. I did happen to find one or two websites for people who fit into my budget, but they were swamped with submissions and wouldn’t have been able to work on my novel by the time I was hoping to release.

With these sad but true realizations, I found myself searching for other avenues for editing. I am confident in my writing ability and do not find my work to be riddled with mistakes, but I would rather my novel be the best it could for a more enjoyable read. The worst person to edit your writings is yourself. You already know what the sentence should read as, so a mistake is much easier to slip by you than a reader.

My research brought a few editing ideas, like have a trusted source read over your work. Many people within my network enjoy reading books as much as I do, so this was an easy suggestion to follow. A simple slip of ‘find me’ turning into ‘find be’ will read funny to someone who is enjoying your work for the first time.

Another was to use the “Find” tool. If you are using most any computer program, pressing CTRL+F simultaneously will call forth this search option. You can type a word into this box and it will find it within the content you are currently viewing. Within Microsoft Word 2007, I used this tool to find the commonly mistaken words, such as you’re, your, too, to, their, there, they’re, etc., to correct any mistypes.

The last tool I used was, of course, Spell/Grammar Check. DO NOT IGNORE! This simple tool so many people know exists is not used frequently enough. Most of us now rely on the auto-correct feature, so when we misspell addresss, we automatically think the software will fix it, but as seen above, the auto-correct does not always work. Before you consider any document complete, make sure you use this simple tool!

As my writing progresses, I will be sure to share every ounce of wisdom I find useful with my fellow independent authors. Happy writing!